Category: People’s Lives

Working In The Mine, Do Not Deny It, Shorten People’s Lives.

He started with 14 years because family circumstances required it.

He spent thirty years in the mine until damn silicosis forced him to leave. Retired for more than three decades, he still looks with In your thirty years of profession, did the work in the mine change a lot? – Luckily yes, although when I retired there were still things to do. In the case of work, I started by chopping, and I ended up with a hammer.

Before there were no toilets and you had to drill to dust, sometimes without a sponge. Luckily all this has changed, and despite the risks that are always inherent in the life of the miner, safety and working conditions are better. – Is the miner’s work as dangerous as they are painted? -Quite. The miner takes many blows.

The miner always knows when he enters the mine but never if he is going to leave. The mine always involves a risk, that of nature that sometimes rebels against man. Keep in mind that the life of a miner is still underground and that circumstance makes the risk greater — one day by landslides, another by explosions. Even though today there is more security, the risk is always there, and proof of this are the lives that the mine charges each year. -Are you a miner all your life? -This is a profession that marks you. It is true that in the tunnel you can only stay for a few years until the health endures or you can dedicate yourself to something else.

But, in spite of leaving it, you always remember your work underground, the risks and the pains it gives you. From the outside it’s different – People from outside, do you understand perfectly how your profession is? -Do not. They think it’s hard, but they fall short. The life of a miner, in addition to the risk involved, is very dragged. -Working in the mine, does it shorten people’s lives? -Undoubtedly. Silicosis is an inherent risk to us. But in addition to this disease, there are others and endless accidents that mark the life of the miner. All this, if you get to retire and do not suffer a fatal crash, causes your health to deteriorate significantly.

I, despite having to retire early due to disability, will be one of the people who has lived the most. -What was your job at the mine? -I began, like everyone, to be a puncher and over the years I performed all the possible tasks in the tunnel.

I was a chopper, a sweeper, and at the end, a first vigilante. And is that to work in this profession you have to do everything, first because the job demands it, and then why do you have to eat. -In addition to mining, you are passionate about poetry and even have a good number of poems, how did all this come about? -Poetry and painting have always been my passion. Since I was very young, I had concerns, but the circumstances of my life made it difficult for me to go to school. Then, as a miner, I had little time to devote myself to it, although I never left it aside. By retiring and having many hours I was finally able to write poems and paint. Although I play many songs, it is the mine that I mention the most. It will be why a miner always keeps the shaft in mind.